The role of current affect, anticipated affect and spontaneous self-affirmation in decisions to receive self-threatening genetic risk information

Ferrer, Rebecca A, Taber, Jennifer M, Klein, William M P, Harris, Peter R, Lewis, Katie L and Biesecker, Leslie G (2015) The role of current affect, anticipated affect and spontaneous self-affirmation in decisions to receive self-threatening genetic risk information. Cognition and Emotion, 29 (8). ISSN 0269-9931

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Abstract

One reason for not seeking personally threatening information may be negative current and anticipated affective responses. We examined whether current (e.g., worry) and anticipated negative affect predicted intentions to seek sequencing results in the context of an actual genomic sequencing trial (ClinSeq®; n = 545) and whether spontaneous self-affirmation mitigated any (negative) association between affect and intentions. Anticipated affective response negatively predicted intentions to obtain and share results pertaining to both medically actionable and non-actionable disease, whereas current affect was only a marginal predictor. The negative association between anticipated affect and intentions to obtain results pertaining to non-actionable disease was weaker in individuals who were higher in spontaneous self-affirmation. These results have implications for the understanding of current and anticipated affect, self-affirmation and consequential decision-making and contribute to a growing body of evidence on the role of affect in medical decisions.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2015 14:18
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 06:09
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55824

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