Evidence that brief self-affirming implementation intentions can reduce work-related anxiety in downsize survivors

Morgan, James I and Harris, Peter R (2015) Evidence that brief self-affirming implementation intentions can reduce work-related anxiety in downsize survivors. Anxiety, Stress and Coping, 28 (5). pp. 563-575. ISSN 1061-5806

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Workers were recruited from a UK further education college during a period of organizational downsizing. This study assessed the effects of a brief health psychology intervention on work-related stress in downsize survivors.

DESIGN AND METHODS

Sixty-six employees were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: one in which they were asked to create a work-related self-affirming implementation intention (WS-AII) or a control. Feelings of anxiety and depression were measured before and after the intervention or control task and three weeks later. Job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and self-esteem were also measured.

RESULTS

There were statistically significant differences between the WS-AII condition and the control. Workers who created WS-AIIs reported an immediate reduction in anxiety. This reduction was also observed in their appraisal of job-related anxiety three weeks later. There were no significant effects of WS-AIIs on depression, job satisfaction, or self-esteem. There was, however, a significant effect on self-efficacy with workers in the WS-AII condition reporting greater self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS

The present findings suggest that the integration of brief health psychology interventions, such as the WS-AII, into existing organizational practice may be of benefit to the well-being of employees.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2015 14:07
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2015 14:07
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55823
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