Enhancing expected food intake behaviour, hedonics and sensory characteristics of oil-in-water emulsion systems through microstructural properties, oil droplet size and flavour

Lett, Aaron M, Yeomans, Martin R, Norton, Ian T and Norton, Jennifer E (2016) Enhancing expected food intake behaviour, hedonics and sensory characteristics of oil-in-water emulsion systems through microstructural properties, oil droplet size and flavour. Food Quality and Preference, 47 (B). pp. 148-156. ISSN 0950-3293

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Abstract

Food reformulation, either to reduce nutrient content or to enhance satiety, can negatively impact upon sensory characteristics and hedonic appeal, whilst altering satiety expectations. Within numerous food systems, perception of certain sensory attributes, known as satiety-relevant sensory cues, have been shown to play a role in food intake behaviour. Emulsions are a common food structure; their very nature encourages reformulation through structural design approaches. Manipulation of emulsion design has been shown to change perceptions of certain sensory attributes and hedonic appeal, but the role of emulsions in food intake behaviour is less clear. With previous research yet to identify emulsion designs which promote attributes that act as satiety-relevant sensory cues within emulsion based foods, this paper investigates the effect of oil droplet size (d4,3: 0.2–50 μm) and flavour type (Vanilla, Cream and No flavour) on sensory perception, hedonics and expected food intake behaviour. By identifying these attributes, this approach will allow the use of emulsion design approaches to promote the sensory characteristics that act as satiety-relevant sensory cues and/or are related to hedonic appeal. Male participants (n = 24) assessed the emulsions. Oil droplet size resulted in significant differences (P < 0.05) in ratings of Vanilla and Cream flavour intensity, Thickness, Smoothness, Creamy Mouthfeel, Creaminess, Liking, Expected Filling and Expected Hunger in 1 h’s time. Flavour type resulted in significant differences (P < 0.05) in ratings of Vanilla and Cream flavour intensity, Sweetness and Liking. The most substantial finding was that by decreasing oil droplet size, Creaminess perception significantly increased. This significantly increases hedonic appeal, in addition to increasing ratings of Expected Filling and decreased Expected Hunger in 1 h’s time, independently of energy content. If this finding is related to actual eating behaviour, a key target attribute will have been identified which can be manipulated through an emulsions droplet size, allowing the design of hedonically appropriate satiating foods.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2015 15:01
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2016 12:55
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55793
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