Personalized feedback based on a drink-pouring exercise may improve knowledge of, and adherence to, government guidelines for alcohol consumption

de Visser, Richard (2015) Personalized feedback based on a drink-pouring exercise may improve knowledge of, and adherence to, government guidelines for alcohol consumption. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research Online, 39 (2). pp. 317-323. ISSN 0145-6008

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Abstract

Background

Although most people are aware of government guidelines for alcohol consumption, few have accurate knowledge of these and fewer still use these guidelines to monitor their drinking. Most people also lack accurate knowledge of the alcohol content of the drinks they consume. The aim of the study reported here was to examine whether or not personalized feedback on alcohol consumption based on performance in a drink-pouring task and self-reported alcohol intake would improve university students’ knowledge of alcohol consumption guidelines and reduce their alcohol intake.

Methods

A quasi-randomized control trial with a 2-month follow-up was conducted with 200 students aged 18 to 37 in the south of England. Participants were allocated to a “pour + feedback” group that completed a drink-pouring task and received personalized feedback, a “pour only” group that completed the drink-pouring task but did not receive feedback, and a control group.

Results

At follow-up, participants in the “pour + feedback” group had significantly better knowledge of government guidelines, and significantly lower weekly alcohol intake when compared to the “control” and “pour only” groups.

Conclusions

Further refinement of the drink-pouring intervention and feedback is reported in this paper, and assessment of their impact in various populations may lead to better understanding of which elements of personalized feedback have the greatest influence on young people's alcohol use.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 14 Jul 2015 14:39
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 05:27
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55346

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