Repeated ethanol exposure during early and late adolescence: double dissociation of effects on waiting and choice impulsivity

Sanchez-Roige, Sandra, Pena-Oliver, Yolanda, Ripley, Tamzin and Stephens, David N (2014) Repeated ethanol exposure during early and late adolescence: double dissociation of effects on waiting and choice impulsivity. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 38 (10). pp. 2579-2589. ISSN 0145-6008

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A strong association exists between impulsivity and binge drinking, and between adolescent alcohol exposure and alcohol abuse in humans. To understand the extent to which early-life alcohol exposure contributes to increased impulsivity, we developed an animal model of binge drinking using 2 strains of mice, C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2), that differ in both motor impulsivity and alcohol drinking.

METHODS:

Mice were treated with 2 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) during their early (intermittent ethanol exposure [IEE]_Early; postnatal day [PND]30 to 45) or late (IEE_Late; PND45 to 60) adolescence or with saline (control group [CON]) throughout the adolescence period. To determine the consequences IEE on waiting impulsivity and attentional function, the number of premature responses and omissions, respectively, were evaluated in adulthood using the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT). To examine the effects of IEE on choice impulsivity, risky decision making was assessed in adulthood using a mouse version of the Iowa Gambling Task (mIGT). Additionally, the acute effects of EtOH in adulthood on waiting impulsivity and choice preference were investigated.

RESULTS:

We provide experimental evidence that IEE during late, but not early, adolescence disrupts waiting impulsivity and attentional abilities in the 5-CSRTT. In contrast, IEE during early, but not late, adolescence altered risky decision making in the mIGT. D2 mice consistently showed lower premature responding than B6 mice in both the mIGT and the 5-CSRTT, but greater risky decision making on the mIGT. IEE and CON mice showed similar responsiveness to the acute EtOH effects on premature responding, but increased risky choices only in B6_IEE_Early mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our observations suggest a direct effect of IEE during adolescence on waiting and choice impulsivity and attention later in life.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2015 11:12
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2017 15:14
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55250

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