Prevalence and impact of chronic widespread pain in the Bangladeshi and White populations of Tower Hamlets, East London

Choudhury, Yasmin, Bremner, Stephen, Ali, Anwara, Eldridge, Sandra, Griffiths, Chris J, Hussain, Iqbal, Parsons, Suzanne, Rahman, Anisur and Underwood, Martin (2013) Prevalence and impact of chronic widespread pain in the Bangladeshi and White populations of Tower Hamlets, East London. Clinical Rheumatology, 32 (9). pp. 1375-1382. ISSN 0770-3198

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Abstract

The prevalence and impact of chronic pain differ between ethnic groups. We report a study of the comparative prevalence and impact of chronic pain in Bangladeshi, British Bangladeshi and White British/Irish people. We posted a short questionnaire to a random sample of 4,480 patients registered with 16 general practices in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and conducted a longer questionnaire with patients in the waiting areas at those practices. We distinguished between Bangladeshi participants who were born in the UK or had arrived in the UK at the age of 14 or under (British Bangladeshi) and those who arrived in UK at the age of over 14 (Bangladeshi). We obtained 1,223/4,480 (27 %) responses to the short survey and 600/637 (94 %) to the long survey. From the former, the prevalence of chronic pain in the White, British Bangladeshi and Bangladeshi groups was 55, 54 and 72 %, respectively. The corresponding figures from the long survey were 49, 45 and 70 %. Chronic widespread pain was commoner in the Bangladeshi (16 %) than in the White (10 %) or British Bangladeshi (9 %) groups. People with chronic pain experienced poorer quality of life (odds ratio for scoring best possible health vs. good health (or good vs. poor health) 5.6 (95 % confidence interval 3.4 to 9.8)), but we found no evidence of differences between ethnic groups in the impact of chronic pain on the quality of life. Chronic pain is commoner and, of greater severity, in Bangladeshis than in Whites. On most measures in this study, British Bangladeshis resembled the Whites more than the Bangladeshis.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Chronic pain, Comparative prevalence, Ethnicity, Quality of life
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Depositing User: Jane Hale
Date Deposited: 15 May 2015 09:51
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2017 05:52
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/54014

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