Effectiveness of financial incentives to improve adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics: cluster randomised controlled trial

Priebe, Stefan, Yeeles, Ksenija, Bremner, Stephen, Lauber, Cristoph, Eldridge, Sandra, Ashby, Deborah, David, Anthony S, O'Connell, Nicola, Forrest, Alexandra and Burns, Tom (2013) Effectiveness of financial incentives to improve adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics: cluster randomised controlled trial. BMJ, 347 (oct07). f5847-f5847. ISSN 1756-1833

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Abstract

Objective: To test whether offering financial incentives to patients with psychotic disorders is effective in improving adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics.
Design: Cluster randomised controlled trial.
Setting: Community mental health teams in secondary psychiatric care in the United Kingdom.
Participants: Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder, who were prescribed long acting antipsychotic (depot) injections but had received 75% or less of the prescribed injections. We randomly allocated 73 teams with a total of 141 patients. Primary outcome data were available for 35 intervention teams with 75 patients (96% of randomised) and for 31 control teams with 56 patients (89% of randomised).
Interventions: Participants in the intervention group were offered £15 (€17; $22) for each depot injection over a 12 month period. Participants in the control condition received treatment as usual.
Main outcome measure: The primary outcome was the percentage of prescribed depot injections given during the 12 month intervention period. Results 73 teams with 141 consenting patients were randomised, and outcomes were assessed for 131 patients (93%).⇓ Average baseline adherence was 69% in the intervention group and 67% in the control group. During the 12 month trial period adherence was 85% in the intervention group and 71% in the control group. The adjusted effect estimate was 11.5% (95% confidence interval 3.9% to 19.0%, P=0.003). A secondary outcome was an adherence of ≥95%, which was achieved in 28% of the intervention group and 5% of the control group (adjusted odds ratio 8.21, 95% confidence interval 2.00 to 33.67, P=0.003). Although differences in clinician rated clinical improvement between the groups failed to reach statistical significance, patients in the intervention group had more favourable subjective quality of life ratings (β=0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 1.15, P=0.002). The number of admissions to hospital and adverse events were low in both groups and did not show substantial differences.
Conclusion: Offering modest financial incentives to patients with psychotic disorders is an effective method for improving adherence to maintenance treatment with antipsychotics.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The trial is registered with ISRCTN (SRCTN77769281) and is adopted into the UKCRN and MHRN portfolios.
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Depositing User: Jane Hale
Date Deposited: 01 May 2015 15:36
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2017 16:39
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53851

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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
UnsetUnsetNational Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA)07/60/43