Food-conditioned odour rejection in the late stages of the meal, mediating learnt control of meal volume by aftereffects of food consumption

Gibson, E L and Booth, D A (2000) Food-conditioned odour rejection in the late stages of the meal, mediating learnt control of meal volume by aftereffects of food consumption. Appetite, 34 (3). pp. 295-303. ISSN 0195-6663

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Abstract

In a two-bottle choice test, rats drank more of the fluid having a novel odour than that having an odour which had previously been presented in the later part of meals on concentrated maltodextrin solution. Rats are normally more averse to a novel odour than to a familiar odour; therefore, the conditioned reaction to the odour acquired in these circumstances is likely to be an ingestive aversion, rather than merely a lack of preference. Furthermore, this learnt odour rejection was seen only in the second half of the meal, indicating that it is dependent on an ingestion-induced state of repletion. Together then, these observations are evidence that the volume of meals rich in carbohydrate can be controlled by learnt rejection of particular food flavours in the presence of visceral cues specific to repletion (previously dubbed "conditioned satiety"), the only known mechanism by which aftereffects of ingested energy could reduce meal volume.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2015 10:18
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2017 17:29
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53774

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