Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility

Mallorquí­-Bagué, Núria, Garfinkel, Sarah N, Engels, Miriam, Eccles, Jessica A, Pailhez, Guillem, Bulbena, Antonio and Critchley, Hugo D (2014) Neuroimaging and psychophysiological investigation of the link between anxiety, enhanced affective reactivity and interoception in people with joint hypermobility. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. p. 1162. ISSN 1664-1078

[img]
Preview
PDF (This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission.) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: Anxiety is associated with increased physiological reactivity and also increased “interoceptive” sensitivity to such changes in internal bodily arousal. Joint hypermobility, an expression of a common variation in the connective tissue protein collagen, is increasingly recognized as a risk factor to anxiety and related disorders. This study explored the link between anxiety, interoceptive sensitivity and hypermobility in a sub-clinical population using neuroimaging and psychophysiological evaluation.

Methods: Thirty-six healthy volunteers undertook interoceptive sensitivity tests, a clinical examination for hypermobility and completed validated questionnaire measures of state anxiety and body awareness tendency. Nineteen participants also performed an emotional processing paradigm during functional neuroimaging.

Results: We confirmed a significant relationship between state anxiety score and joint hypermobility. Interoceptive sensitivity mediated the relationship between state anxiety and hypermobility. Hypermobile, compared to non-hypermobile, participants displayed heightened neural reactivity to sad and angry scenes within brain regions implicated in anxious feeling states, notably insular cortex.

Conclusions: Our findings highlight the dependence of anxiety state on bodily context, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms through which vulnerability to anxiety disorders arises in people bearing a common variant of collagen.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Depositing User: Christina Lee
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2015 08:49
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2017 08:48
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53765

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update