Distal communication by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): evidence for common ground?

Leavens, David, Reamer, Lisa A, Mareno, Mary Catherine, Russell, Jamie L, Wilson, Daniel, Schapiro, Steve J and Hopkins, William D (2015) Distal communication by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): evidence for common ground? Child Development, 86 (5). pp. 1623-1638. ISSN 0009-3920

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Abstract

Van der Goot et al. (2014, Child Development) proposed that distal, deictic communication indexed the appreciation of the psychological state of a common ground between a signaler and a receiver. In their study, great apes did not signal distally, which they construed as evidence for the human-uniqueness of a sense of common ground. We exposed 166 chimpanzees to food and an experimenter, at an angular displacement, to ask, "Do chimpanzees display distal communication?" Apes were categorized as (a) proximal or (b) distal signalers on each of 4 trials. The number of chimpanzees who communicated proximally did not statistically differ from the number who signaled distally. Therefore, contrary to the claim by van der Goot et al., apes do communicate distally.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0180 Experimental psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0660 Comparative psychology. Animal and human psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0699 Genetic psychology
Depositing User: David Leavens
Date Deposited: 16 Apr 2015 08:25
Last Modified: 21 Aug 2017 01:00
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53667

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