The relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three contrasting approaches to partner notification for curable sexually transmitted infections: a cluster randomised trial in primary care

Cassell, Jackie A, Dodds, Julie, Estcourt, Claudia, Llewellyn, Carrie, Lanza, Stefania, Richens, John, Smith, Helen, Symonds, Merle, Copas, Andrew, Roberts, Tracy, Walters, Kate, White, Peter, Lowndes, Catherine, Mistry, Hema, Rossello-Roig, Melcior, Smith, Hilary and Rait, Greta (2015) The relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three contrasting approaches to partner notification for curable sexually transmitted infections: a cluster randomised trial in primary care. Health Technology Assessment, 19 (5). pp. 1-115. ISSN 1366-5278

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Abstract

Since 1998 there has been a substantial increase in reported cases of sexually transmitted infection (STI),
most strikingly in the 16–24 years age group.1 Across genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in the UK in 2007, young people accounted for 65% of chlamydia cases, 50% of cases of genital warts and 50% of gonorrhoea infections.1 Chlamydia is the most common STI in under-25s. Since 1998, the rate of diagnosed chlamydia has more than doubled in the 16–24 years age group (from 447 per 100,000 in 1998 to 1102 per 100,000 in 2007). This may be because of a combination of a higher proportion of
young people testing, improved diagnostic methods and increased risk behaviour.1 Chlamydia infection can
frequently go undetected, particularly in women, as it is often asymptomatic.1 If left untreated, chlamydia
can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility in women. This highlights the importance of testing
this higher-risk age group to ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment. It is estimated that 11–12% of 16- to 19-year-olds presenting at a GUM clinic with an acute STI will
become reinfected within a year.2 In order to minimise reinfection, preventative measures are required,
including effective methods of notifying partners to ensure rapid diagnosis and treatment and reduce the
likelihood of index patients being reinfected from the same source.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
School of Engineering and Informatics > Informatics
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0643 Communicable diseases and public health > RA0644 Individual diseases or groups of diseases, A-Z
Depositing User: Jane Hale
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2015 07:51
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2017 13:59
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/53471

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