Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping

Deribe, Kebede, Brooker, Simon J, Pullan, Rachel L, Sime, Heven, Gebretsadik, Abeba, Assefa, Ashenafi, Kebede, Amha, Hailu, Asrat, Rebollo, Maria P, Shafi, Oumer, Bockarie, Moses J, Aseffa, Abraham, Reithinger, Richard, Cano, Jorge, Enquselassie, Fikre, Newport, Melanie J and Davey, Gail (2015) Epidemiology and individual, household and geographical risk factors of podoconiosis in ethiopia: results from the first nationwide mapping. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 92 (1). pp. 148-58. ISSN 0002-9637

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Abstract

Although podoconiosis is one of the major causes of tropical lymphoedema and is endemic in Ethiopia its epidemiology and risk factors are poorly understood. Individual-level data for 129,959 individuals from 1,315 communities in 659 woreda (districts) were collected for a nationwide integrated survey of lymphatic filariasis and podoconiosis. Blood samples were tested for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen using immunochromatographic card tests. A clinical algorithm was used to reach a diagnosis of podoconiosis by excluding other potential causes of lymphoedema of the lower limb. Bayesian multilevel models were used to identify individual and environmental risk factors. Overall, 8,110 of 129,959 (6.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1-6.4%) surveyed individuals were identified with lymphoedema of the lower limb, of whom 5,253 (4.0%, 95% CI 3.9-4.1%) were confirmed to be podoconiosis cases. In multivariable analysis, being female, older, unmarried, washing the feet less frequently than daily, and being semiskilled or unemployed were significantly associated with increased risk of podoconiosis. Attending formal education and living in a house with a covered floor were associated with decreased risk of podoconiosis. Podoconiosis exhibits marked geographical variation across Ethiopia, with variation in risk associated with variation in rainfall, enhanced vegetation index, and altitude.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Podoconiosis mapping, Podoconiosis prevelance rate
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0440 Study and teaching. Research
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0639 Transmission of disease
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0771 Rural health and hygiene. Rural health services
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0791 Medical geography. Medical climatology and meteorology
Depositing User: Gharib Murbe
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2015 11:48
Last Modified: 04 Aug 2017 21:12
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/52994

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