Shame and guilt—do they really differ in their focus of evaluation? Wanting to change the self and behavior in response to ingroup immorality

Gausel, Nicolay and Brown, Rupert (2012) Shame and guilt—do they really differ in their focus of evaluation? Wanting to change the self and behavior in response to ingroup immorality. The Journal of Social Psychology, 152 (5). pp. 547-567. ISSN 0022-4545

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Abstract

Shame and guilt are often theorized to differ on a self versus behavior focus. However, we propose that this is not true when taking a group perspective. In our field study, 196 communal participants were confronted with historical ingroup immorality. Results showed that participants who were old enough to have understood what happened in that time-period felt more guilt and shame than did those who were too young. Partly due to their ingroup anger, shame motivated an intention to change the ingroup self and behavior. In contrast, partly due to personal anger, guilt motivated an intention to change personal self and behavior. This suggests that the distinction between shame and guilt are not as clear-cut as previous research have assumed.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > HM1001 Social psychology
Depositing User: Rupert Brown
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2015 07:16
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2015 07:16
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/52957
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