Acculturation is a two-way street: majority–minority perspectives of outgroup acculturation preferences and the mediating role of multiculturalism and threat

Celeste, Laura, Brown, Rupert, Tip, Linda K and Matera, Camilla (2014) Acculturation is a two-way street: majority–minority perspectives of outgroup acculturation preferences and the mediating role of multiculturalism and threat. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 43 (Part B). pp. 304-320. ISSN 0147-1767

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Abstract

A 2 × 2 experimental design investigated the effects of perceived outgroup acculturation preferences on intergroup outcomes for both the Hispanic-minority (N = 50) and European-American-majority (N = 163) in California, USA. Participants read fabricated interviews which manipulated outgroup acculturation preferences for contact (high vs. low) and culture maintenance (high vs. low). For majority participants: Hispanics' desire for contact strongly predicted positive intergroup emotions and low prejudice; desire for culture maintenance only impacted emotions. These acculturation dimensions interacted, revealing the most favorable intergroup outcomes for the high contact, high culture maintenance condition (integration). Support for multiculturalism, along with realistic threat, mediated these effects. Minority responses differed: for Hispanics, perceived European-Americans’ acculturation preferences did not impact intergroup emotions or prejudice, but their sup-port for multiculturalism did suppress the interaction of acculturation dimensions on intergroup emotions. The acculturation attitude that exemplified American support for multiculturalism differed for majority and minority participants (integration and separation, respectively). Further majority–minority discrepancies were found with a newly developed measure of behavioral investment in acculturation.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Acculturation, Multiculturalism, Perceived threat, Behavioral investment, Intergroup emotions, Prejudice
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0180 Experimental psychology
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > HM1001 Social psychology > HM1106 Interpersonal relations. Social behaviour
Depositing User: Linda Tip
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2014 15:46
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 08:16
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/51505

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