Consequences of interspecific competition on the virulence and genetic composition of a nucleopolyhedrovirus in Spodoptera frugiperda larvae parasitized by Chelonus insularis

Escribano, A, Williams, T, Goulson, D, Cave, R D, Chapman, J W and Caballero, P (2001) Consequences of interspecific competition on the virulence and genetic composition of a nucleopolyhedrovirus in Spodoptera frugiperda larvae parasitized by Chelonus insularis. Biocontrol Science and Technology, 11 (5). pp. 649-662. ISSN 0958-3157

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Nucleopolyhedroviruses (Baculoviridae) are virulent insect pathogens that generally show a high degree of host specificity and have recognized potential as biological insecticides. Whenever viruses are applied for pest control, a proportion of the infected insects will also be parasitized by hymenopteran or dipteran parasitoids and interspecific competition for host resources will occur; the severity of such competition is likely to be modulated to a large degree by the virulence of each type of parasite. We examined the impact of parasitism by the solitary egg-larval endoparasitoid Chelonus insularis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on the speed of kill of nucleopolyhedrovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae and the pattern of host growth and virus production in infected and/or parasitized hosts. We also examined the effect of parasitism on the virulence, infectivity and genetic composition of serially passaged virus. Both parasitism and viral infection resulted in a marked reduction in host growth. When third instar larvae were dually parasitized and virus-infected, the growth rate was even more severely affected compared to parasitized larvae. There was a significant increase in virus production in larvae infected at later instars. Interspecific competition resulted in a substantial decrease in pathogen production in parasitized larvae infected at the fourth instar, but not in parasitized larvae infected at earlier instars. The serial passage experiment resulted in the appearance of four distinct genetic isolates of the virus detected by restriction endonuclease analysis. Of the three isolates that appeared in nonparasitized larvae, two showed increased virulence, expressed by mean time to death, and for one of these the infectivity, expressed as LC50, was reduced. One isolate that appeared in parasitized larvae (isolate D) had increased virulence and infectivity. Southern blot analysis indicated that virus isolate D was most likely generated by point mutation of a restriction site or by alterations such as duplications, deletions or by recombination of two or more genotypic variants present in the wild-type nucleopolyhedrovirus isolate. Our study provides clear evidence of interspecific competition within the host, since, depending on the timing of inoculation, adverse effects were observed upon both the parasitoid and the virus.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Evolution, Behaviour and Environment
Depositing User: Catrina Hey
Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2014 10:34
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2014 10:34
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/51269
📧 Request an update