Rapid mapping of visual receptive fields by filtered back-projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging

Johnston, Jamie, Ding, Huayu, Seibel, Sofie H, Esposti, Federico and Lagnado, Leon (2014) Rapid mapping of visual receptive fields by filtered back-projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging. The Journal of Physiology. n/a-n/a. ISSN 00223751

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Abstract

Neurons in the visual system vary widely in the spatiotemporal properties of their receptive fields (RFs), and understanding these variations is key to elucidating how visual information is processed. We present a new approach for mapping RFs based on the filtered back projection (FBP), an algorithm used for tomographic reconstructions. To estimate RFs, a series of bars were flashed across the retina at pseudo‐random positions and at a minimum of five orientations. We apply this method to retinal neurons and show that it can accurately recover the spatial RF and impulse response of ganglion cells recorded on a multi‐electrode array. We also demonstrate its utility for in vivo imaging by mapping the RFs of an array of bipolar cell synapses expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator. We find that FBP offers several advantages over the commonly used spike‐triggered average (STA): (i) ON and OFF components of a RF can be separated; (ii) the impulse response can be reconstructed at sample rates of 125 Hz, rather than the refresh rate of a monitor; (iii) FBP reveals the response properties of neurons that are not evident using STA, including those that display orientation selectivity, or fire at low mean spike rates; and (iv) the FBP method is fast, allowing the RFs of all the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in a field of view to be reconstructed in under 4 min. Use of the FBP will benefit investigations of the visual system that employ electrophysiology or optical reporters to measure activity across populations of neurons.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: online first
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
Subjects: Q Science
Depositing User: Catrina Hey
Date Deposited: 30 Oct 2014 14:36
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2017 16:58
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/50790

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