Pollen elicits proboscis extension but does not reinforce PER learning in honeybees

Nicholls, Beth and Hempel de Ibarra, Natalie (2013) Pollen elicits proboscis extension but does not reinforce PER learning in honeybees. Insects, 4 (4). pp. 542-557. ISSN 2075-4450

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Abstract

The function of pollen as a reward for foraging bees is little understood, though there is evidence to suggest that it can reinforce associations with visual and olfactory floral cues. Foraging bees do not feed on pollen, thus one could argue that it cannot serve as an appetitive reinforcer in the same way as sucrose. However, ingestion is not a critical parameter for sucrose reinforcement, since olfactory proboscis extension (PER) learning can be conditioned through antennal stimulation only. During pollen collection, the antennae and mouthparts come into contact with pollen, thus it is possible that pollen reinforces associative learning through similar gustatory pathways as sucrose. Here pollen was presented as the unconditioned stimulus (US), either in its natural state or in a 30% pollen-water solution, and was found to elicit proboscis extension following antennal stimulation. Control groups were exposed to either sucrose or a clean sponge as the US, or an unpaired presentation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and pollen US. Despite steady levels of responding to the US, bees did not learn to associate a neutral odour with the delivery of a pollen reward, thus whilst pollen has a proboscis extension releasing function, it does not reinforce olfactory PER learning.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Evolution, Behaviour and Environment
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology
Q Science > QL Zoology > QL0750 Animal behaviour
Depositing User: Beth Nicholls
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2014 11:12
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 04:03
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/50601

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