New Hollywood in the rust belt: urban decline and downtown renaissance in 'The King of Marvin Gardens' and 'Rocky'

Webb, Lawrence (2015) New Hollywood in the rust belt: urban decline and downtown renaissance in 'The King of Marvin Gardens' and 'Rocky'. Cinema Journal, 54 (4). pp. 100-125. ISSN 0009-7101

[img]
Preview
PDF (This is a pre-copyedited version of an article accepted for publication in Cinema Journal following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available through the University of Texas Press) - Accepted Version
Download (522kB) | Preview

Abstract

This article reviews the geographical dynamics of New Hollywood, arguing that the industrial crisis of 1969-1971 catalyzed further decentralization of location shooting beyond Los Angeles, bringing new types of urban space into view. It examines the parallel crisis and restructuring of the film industry and the inner city via two films, The King of Marvin Gardens (1972) and Rocky (1976), which are emblematic of distinct phases in the development of New Hollywood. Through their aesthetic strategies, narrative structure and mapping of cinematic space, these films produce allegories of urban decline and renewal that closely engaged with the transformation of the American city, from the urban crisis of the late 1960s to neoliberal programs of renewal in the late 1970s.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Media, Film and Music > Media and Film
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN1993 Motion pictures
Depositing User: Lawrence Webb
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2014 08:30
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 14:07
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/50576

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update