Cold war radio and the Hungarian uprising, 1956

Webb, Alban (2013) Cold war radio and the Hungarian uprising, 1956. Cold War History, 13 (2). pp. 221-238. ISSN 1468-2745

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Abstract

Overseas broadcasting during the Hungarian uprising indicated a new phase in the relationship between the media and the international events they report. Mapping the course of the uprising for Hungarian and global audiences alike, the western radios occupied multiple broadcast, diplomatic, and cultural terrains. The anti-communist rhetoric of their output allied to their perceived influence on listeners behind the Iron Curtain made the Hungarian uprising a cause célèbre of international broadcasting: one that revealed both the strategic significance of cold war radio as well as the limits of its use as a tactical weapon.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Media, Film and Music > Media and Film
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D031 Political and diplomatic history
D History General and Old World > D History (General)
D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D839 Post-war History, 1945 on
D History General and Old World > DA History of Great Britain
D History General and Old World > DAW History of Central Europe
D History General and Old World > DB History of Austria. Liechtenstein. Hungary. Czechoslovakia > DB0901 Hungary
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics > P0087 Communication. Mass media
Depositing User: Alban Webb
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2014 07:59
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2014 07:59
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/50572
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