Borders that divide: education and religion in Ghana and Togo since colonial times

Cogneau, Denis and Moradi, Alexander (2014) Borders that divide: education and religion in Ghana and Togo since colonial times. Journal of Economic History, 74 (3). pp. 694-729. ISSN 0022-0507

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Abstract

The partition of German Togoland after World War I provides a natural experiment to test the impact of British and French colonization. Using data of recruits to the Ghanaian colonial army 1908–1955, we find that literacy and religious affiliation diverge at the border between the parts of Togoland under British and French control as early as in the 1920s. We partly attribute this to policies towards missionary schools. The divergence is only visible in the South where educational and evangelization efforts were strong. Contemporary survey data show that border effects that began in colonial times still persist today.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > Economics
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Depositing User: Alexander Moradi
Date Deposited: 08 Sep 2014 10:41
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2014 10:41
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/49746
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