Transcription of ribosomal genes can cause nondisjunction

Machin, Felix, Torres-Rosell, Jordi, De Piccoli, Giacomo, Carballo, Jesus, Cha, Rita, Jarmuz, Adam and Aragon, Luis (2006) Transcription of ribosomal genes can cause nondisjunction. The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), 173 (6). pp. 893-903. ISSN 0021-9525

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Abstract

Mitotic disjunction of the repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) involves specialized segregation mechanisms dependent on the conserved phosphatase Cdc14. The reason behind this requirement is unknown. We show that rDNA segregation requires Cdc14 partly because of its physical length but most importantly because a fraction of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are transcribed at very high rates. We show that cells cannot segregate rDNA without Cdc14 unless they undergo genetic rearrangements that reduce rDNA copy number. We then demonstrate that cells with normal length rDNA arrays can segregate rDNA in the absence of Cdc14 as long as rRNA genes are not transcribed. In addition, our study uncovers an unexpected role for the replication barrier protein Fob1 in rDNA segregation that is independent of Cdc14. These findings demonstrate that highly transcribed loci can cause chromosome nondisjunction.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Sussex Centre for Genome Damage and Stability
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0001 Natural history (General) > QH0201 Microscopy
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology > QH0426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology > QH0426 Genetics > QH0447 Genes. Alleles. Genome
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology > QH0426 Genetics > QH0460 Mutations
Q Science > QR Microbiology
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Depositing User: Jesus Carballo
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2014 08:47
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2017 09:48
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/49133

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