Predominant influence of environmental determinants on the persistence and avidity maturation of antibody responses to vaccines in infants

Marchant, Arnaud, Pihlgren, Maria, Goetghebuer, Tessa, Weiss, Helen A, Ota, Martin O C, Schlegel-Hauter, Susana E, Whittle, Hilton, Lambert, Paul-Henri, Newport, Melanie J and Siegrist, Claire-Anne (2006) Predominant influence of environmental determinants on the persistence and avidity maturation of antibody responses to vaccines in infants. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 193 (11). pp. 1598-605. ISSN 0022-1899

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Immune responses are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. We previously reported that genetic factors control early antibody responses to vaccines in Gambian infants. For the present study, we evaluated the determinants of the memory phase of immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses.

METHODS

Antibody responses to tetanus toxoid (TT), measles vaccines, and environmental antigens (total IgG levels) were measured in 210 Gambian twin pairs recruited at birth. Intrapair correlations for monozygous and dizygous pairs were compared to estimate the environmental and genetic components of variations in response.

RESULTS

In contrast to antibody responses measured in infants at age 5 months, 1 month after immunization, no significant contribution of genetic factors to anti-TT antibody and total IgG levels was detected at age 12 months. Genetic factors controlled measles antibody responses in 12-month-old infants, which indicates that the increasing influence of environmental determinants on anti-TT responses was not related to the older age of the children but, rather, to the time elapsed since immunization. Environmental factors also predominantly controlled affinity maturation and the production of high-avidity antibodies to TT.

CONCLUSIONS

Genetic determinants control the early phase of the vaccine antibody response in Gambian infants, whereas environmental determinants predominantly influence antibody persistence and avidity maturation.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0251 Constitutional diseases (General)
Depositing User: pam Thompson
Date Deposited: 09 May 2014 13:40
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2017 11:58
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/48378
📧 Request an update