Perceived responder legitimacy and group identification predict cooperation and compliance in a mass decontamination field exercise

Carter, Holly, Drury, John, Amlôt, Richard, Rubin, G James and Williams, Richard (2013) Perceived responder legitimacy and group identification predict cooperation and compliance in a mass decontamination field exercise. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 35 (6). pp. 575-585. ISSN 0197-3533

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Abstract

Emergency responders’ failure to communicate effectively during decontamination following a chemical or biological incident has been associated with increased public anxiety and reduced public compliance. In this study we applied the social identity approach to evaluating a field exercise that involved mass decontamination. Questionnaires were collected from 115 volunteers, who participated in the exercise as simulated casualties. Volunteers’ perceptions of effective responder communication predicted increased self-reported compliance with decontamination, mediated by perceived responder legitimacy and identification with other group members. Developing effective communication strategies using a social psychology perspective could improve the way in which incidents are managed.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: John Drury
Date Deposited: 01 May 2014 09:25
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2017 10:41
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/48322

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