Why vocal production of atypical sounds in apes and its cerebral correlates have a lot to say about the origin of language

Meguerditchian, Adrien, Taglialatela, Jared P, Leavens, David A and Hopkins, William D (2014) Why vocal production of atypical sounds in apes and its cerebral correlates have a lot to say about the origin of language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37 (6). pp. 565-566. ISSN 0140-525X

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Abstract

Ackermann et al. mentioned the "acquisition of species-atypical sounds" in apes without any discussions. In our commentary, we demonstrate that these atypical sounds in chimpanzees not only include laryngeal sounds but also have a major significance regarding the origins of language, if we consider looking at their context of use, their social properties, their relations with gestures, their lateralization and their neurofunctional correlates as well.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0180 Experimental psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0309 Consciousness. Cognition Including learning, attention, comprehension, memory, imagination, genius, intelligence, thought and thinking, psycholinguistics, mental fatigue
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0608 Will. Volition. Choice. Control
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0660 Comparative psychology. Animal and human psychology
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics > P0099.5 Nonverbal communication
Depositing User: David Leavens
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2014 08:55
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2017 22:42
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/47136

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