Combining self-affirmation and implementation intentions: evidence of detrimental effects on behavioral outcomes

Jessop, Donna C, Sparks, Paul, Buckland, Nicola, Harris, Peter R and Churchill, Sue (2014) Combining self-affirmation and implementation intentions: evidence of detrimental effects on behavioral outcomes. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 47 (2). pp. 137-147. ISSN 0883-6612

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Abstract

BACKGROUND
There is limited evidence that self-affirmation manipulations can promote health behavior change.
PURPOSE
The purpose of this study was to explore whether the efficacy of a self-affirmation manipulation at promoting exercise could be enhanced by an implementation intention intervention.
METHODS
Participants (Study 1 N = 120, Study 2 N = 116) were allocated to one of four conditions resulting from the two (self-affirmation manipulation: no affirmation, affirmation) by two (implementation intention manipulation: no implementation intention, implementation intention) experimental design. Exercise behavior was assessed 1 week post-intervention.
RESULTS
Contrary to prediction, those participants receiving both manipulations were significantly less likely to increase the amount they exercised compared to those receiving only the self-affirmation manipulation.
CONCLUSION
Incorporating an implementation intention manipulation alongside a self-affirmation manipulation had a detrimental effect on exercise behavior; participants receiving both manipulations exercised significantly less in the week following the intervention.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 12 Nov 2013 15:33
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 09:06
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/46998

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