Sensorimotor coordination and metastability in a situated HKB model

Santos, Bruno, Barandiarian, Xabier, Husbands, Phil, Aguilera, Miguel and Bedia, Manuel (2013) Sensorimotor coordination and metastability in a situated HKB model. Connection Science, 24 (4). pp. 143-161. ISSN 0954-0091

[img]
Preview
PDF (preprint) - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Oscillatory phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and have become particularly relevant for the study of brain and behaviour. One of the simplest, yet explanatorily powerful, models of oscillatory Coordination Dynamics is the Haken–Kelso–Bunz (HKB) model. The metastable regime described by the HKB equation has been hypothesised to be the signature of brain oscillatory dynamics underlying sensorimotor coordination. Despite evidence supporting such a hypothesis, to our knowledge, there are still very few models (if any) where the HKB equation generates spatially situated behaviour and, at the same time, has its dynamics modulated by the behaviour it generates (by means of the sensory feedback resulting from body movement). This work presents a computational model where the HKB equation controls an agent performing a simple gradient climbing task and shows (i) how different metastable dynamical patterns in the HKB equation are generated and sustained by the continuous interaction between the agent and its environment; and (ii) how the emergence of functional metastable patterns in the HKB equation – i.e. patterns that generate gradient climbing behaviour – depends not only on the structure of the agent's sensory input but also on the coordinated coupling of the agent's motor–sensory dynamics. This work contributes to Kelso's theoretical framework and also to the understanding of neural oscillations and sensorimotor coordination.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Engineering and Informatics > Informatics
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA0075 Electronic computers. Computer science
Q Science > QP Physiology > QP0351 Neurophysiology and neuropsychology
Depositing User: Phil Husbands
Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2013 11:31
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 09:31
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/46382

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update