A qualitative study exploring barriers related to use of footwear in rural highland Ethiopia: implications for neglected tropical disease control

Ayode, Desta, McBride, Colleen, de Heer, Hendrik D, Watanabe, Emi, Gebreyesus, Tsega, Tora, Abebayehu, Tadele, Getnet and Davey, Gail (2013) A qualitative study exploring barriers related to use of footwear in rural highland Ethiopia: implications for neglected tropical disease control. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 7 (4). e2199. ISSN 1935-2727

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Abstract

Background

The role of footwear in protection against a range of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) is gaining increasing attention. Better understanding of the behaviors that influence use of footwear will lead to improved ability to measure shoe use and will be important for those implementing footwear programs.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model we assessed social, behavioral, environmental, educational and ecological needs influencing whether and when children wear shoes in a rural highland Ethiopian community endemic for podoconiosis. Information was gathered from 242 respondents using focus groups, semi-structured interviews and extended case studies. Shoe-wearing norms were said to be changing, with going barefoot increasingly seen as ‘shameful’. Shoes were thought to confer dignity as well as protection against injury and cold. However, many practical and social barriers prevented the desire to wear shoes from being translated into practice. Limited financial resources meant that people were neither able to purchase more than one pair of shoes to ensure their longevity nor afford shoes of the preferred quality. As a result of this limited access, shoes were typically preserved for special occasions and might not be provided for children until they reached a certain age. While some barriers (for example fit of shoe and fear of labeling through use of a certain type of shoe) may be applicable only to certain diseases, underlying structural level barriers related to poverty (for example price, quality, unsuitability for daily activities and low risk perception) are likely to be relevant to a range of NTDs.

Conclusions/Significance

Using well established conceptual models of health behavior adoption, we identified several barriers to shoe wearing that are amenable to intervention and which we anticipate will be of benefit to those considering NTD prevention through shoe distribution.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Depositing User: Gail Davey
Date Deposited: 02 May 2013 11:57
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2017 08:57
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/44592

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