Effect of androgen suppression compared with androgen receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in men with prostate cancer

Dockery, Frances, Bulpitt, Christopher J, Agarwal, Sanjiv, Vernon, Clare and Rajkumar, Chakravarthi (2009) Effect of androgen suppression compared with androgen receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in men with prostate cancer. Journal of Andrology, 30 (4). pp. 410-415. ISSN 0196-3635

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Abstract

Endogenous testosterone and estradiol are thought to be cardio-protective in men. We wanted to determine the effects of 2 different anti-androgen therapies on arterial stiffness as one suppresses (goserelin--a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analog) while the other increases (bicalutamide--an androgen receptor blocker) both testosterone and estradiol. We conducted a randomized trial on 43 men (mean age, 71.2 +/- 6.2 years) with localized prostate cancer. They received either goserelin or bicalutamide for 24 weeks. Carotid-femoral (C-F) and carotid-radial (C-R) pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured. Twenty age- and disease-matched men with prostate cancer on no active treatment were studied in a similar manner. After 12 weeks of goserelin, radial artery PWV increased significantly from baseline and a nonsignificant increase was observed in femoral PWV (change from baseline radial: +1.4 m/s, P = .002, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P = .127) Both PWV measures increased significantly with bicalutamide (change from baseline radial: +0.8, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P <or= .049). PWV increased further after 24 weeks with goserelin (change from baseline radial: +1.7, femoral: +1.3 m/s, P <or= .049 for both) but not bicalutamide (change from baseline radial: +0.4, femoral: +0.4 m/s, P not significant [NS]); however, comparison of changes between the 2 drugs were not significantly different at either 12 or 24 weeks (P >or= .967 at 12 weeks and P >or= .07 at 24 weeks). The untreated men studied in parallel showed no changes at 12 or 24 weeks in either PWV measure. Anti-androgen treatment in men might increase large artery stiffness, an adverse cardiovascular risk factor; however, the effect was not maintained with testosterone receptor blockade, in the longer term, but tended to be sustained with suppression therapy. This could relate to the different sex hormone effects of the 2 therapies.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Clinical Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0581 Specialties of internal medicine > RC0952 Geriatrics
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Depositing User: Simone Breckell
Date Deposited: 01 May 2013 10:40
Last Modified: 01 May 2013 10:40
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/44571
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