Deficiency in origin licensing proteins impairs cilia formation: implications for the aetiology of meier-gorlin syndrome

Stiff, Tom, Alagoz, Meryem, Alcantara, Diana, Outwin, Emily, Brunner, Han G, Bongers, Ernie M H F, O'Driscoll, Mark and Jeggo, Penny A (2013) Deficiency in origin licensing proteins impairs cilia formation: implications for the aetiology of meier-gorlin syndrome. PLoS genetics, 9 (3). e1003360. ISSN 1553-7404

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Abstract

Mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6, which encode proteins required for DNA replication origin licensing, cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a disorder conferring microcephaly, primordial dwarfism, underdeveloped ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Mutations in ATR, which also functions during replication, can cause Seckel syndrome, a clinically related disorder. These findings suggest that impaired DNA replication could underlie the developmental defects characteristic of these disorders. Here, we show that although origin licensing capacity is impaired in all patient cells with mutations in origin licensing component proteins, this does not correlate with the rate of progression through S phase. Thus, the replicative capacity in MGS patient cells does not correlate with clinical manifestation. However, ORC1-deficient cells from MGS patients and siRNA-mediated depletion of origin licensing proteins also have impaired centrosome and centriole copy number. As a novel and unexpected finding, we show that they also display a striking defect in the rate of formation of primary cilia. We demonstrate that this impacts sonic hedgehog signalling in ORC1-deficient primary fibroblasts. Additionally, reduced growth factor-dependent signaling via primary cilia affects the kinetics of cell cycle progression following cell cycle exit and re-entry, highlighting an unexpected mechanism whereby origin licensing components can influence cell cycle progression. Finally, using a cell-based model, we show that defects in cilia function impair chondroinduction. Our findings raise the possibility that a reduced efficiency in forming cilia could contribute to the clinical features of MGS, particularly the bone development abnormalities, and could provide a new dimension for considering developmental impacts of licensing deficiency.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Sussex Centre for Genome Damage and Stability
Subjects: Q Science > QM Human anatomy > QM0001 General
Q Science > QM Human anatomy > QM0601 Human embryology
R Medicine > RB Pathology > RB127 Manifestations of disease
Depositing User: Mark O'Driscoll
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2013 13:38
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 07:51
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/44145

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