Spontaneous gender categorization in masking and priming studies: key for distinguishing Jane from John Doe but not Madonna from Sinatra

Habibi, Ruth and Khurana, Beena (2012) Spontaneous gender categorization in masking and priming studies: key for distinguishing Jane from John Doe but not Madonna from Sinatra. PloS ONE, 7 (2). e32377. ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Facial recognition is key to social interaction, however with unfamiliar faces only generic information, in the form of facial stereotypes such as gender and age is available. Therefore is generic information more prominent in unfamiliar versus familiar face processing? In order to address the question we tapped into two relatively disparate stages of face processing. At the early stages of encoding, we employed perceptual masking to reveal that only perception of unfamiliar face targets is affected by the gender of the facial masks. At the semantic end; using a priming paradigm, we found that while to-be-ignored unfamiliar faces prime lexical decisions to gender congruent stereotypic words, familiar faces do not. Our findings indicate that gender is a more salient dimension in unfamiliar relative to familiar face processing, both in early perceptual stages as well as later semantic stages of person construal

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2012 08:35
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2017 12:49
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/42594

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