Children's reasoning about self-presentation following rule violations: the role of self-focused attention

Banerjee, Robin, Bennett, Mark and Luke, Nikki (2012) Children's reasoning about self-presentation following rule violations: the role of self-focused attention. Child Development, 83 (5). pp. 1805-1821. ISSN 0009-3920

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Abstract

Rule violations are likely to serve as key contexts for learning to reason about public identity. In an initial study with 91 children aged 49 years, social emotions and self-presentational concerns were more likely to be cited when children were responding to hypothetical vignettes involving social-conventional rather than moral violations. In 2 further studies with 376 children aged 49 years, experimental manipulations of self-focused attention (either by leading children to believe they were being video-recorded or by varying audience reactions to transgressions) were found to elicit greater attention to social evaluation following moral violations, although self-presentational concerns were consistently salient in the context of social-conventional violations. The role of rule transgressions in childrens emerging self-awareness and social understanding is discussed

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: 003UE Times Cited:0 Cited References Count:61
Keywords: peer relations conventional transgressions subjective identification individual-differences social interactions emotions mind consequences disclaimers attribution
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Depositing User: Robin Banerjee
Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2012 13:13
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2012 13:13
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/42289
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