The potential role of heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease: evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies

Ghayour-Mobarhan, M, Rahsepar, A A, Tavallaie, S, Rahsepar, S and Ferns, G A A (2009) The potential role of heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease: evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies. Advances in Clinical Chemistry, 48. pp. 27-72. ISSN 0065-2423

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Abstract

The heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved families of proteins expressed by a number of cell types following exposure to stressful environmental conditions. These conditions include several known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A number of the HSPs have been shown to be molecular chaperones that are involved in the refolding of other damaged protein molecules. Over the past two decades there has been an increasing interest in the relationship between HSPs and cardiovascular disease, and particularly whether an autoimmune response may be implicated. The fact that microorganisms also produce HSPs, and that these are homologous to human HSPs has given rise to concept of molecular mimicry. While most of the past studies have focused on HSP 65 and 70, there has been recent interest and investigations of the possible role of the smaller HSPs, such as HSP27, in atherogenesis. Furthermore, the possibility that autoimmunity may be mediating the deleterious effects of HSPs has led some investigators to explore tolerization as a potential therapeutic approach.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Division of Medical Education
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R735 Medical education
Depositing User: Gordon Ferns
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2012 14:12
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2012 14:12
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/42206
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