Gender and employability patterns amongst UK ICT graduates: how leaky is the pipeline?

Woodfield, Ruth (2012) Gender and employability patterns amongst UK ICT graduates: how leaky is the pipeline? In: Pande, Rekha and van der Weide, Theo (eds.) Globalization, technology diffusion and gender disparity: social impacts of ICTs. IGI Global, Hershey, PA, pp. 184-199. ISBN 9781466600201

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Abstract

This chapter explores the employment patterns of male and female Computer Science graduates in the UK. It is shown that women Computer Science graduates fare less well than men on a variety of mea- sures of employment success, despite being more likely to leave university with a better degree. Their performance is compared to that of women from a comparable scientific and male-dominated discipline: engineering. The results show that women graduates from Computer Science degrees enjoy less suc- cess in securing graduate-level work than that experienced by other groups of women, including those graduating from engineering. Most notably, women computer science graduates are less likely to secure graduate-level work within the work sphere that their degree has prepared them for: ICT. The utility of explanations focusing on individual preferences, versus those focusing on extra-individual, demand-side factors, is discussed in the context of the findings.

Item Type: Book Section
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Sociology
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
L Education
T Technology
Depositing User: Ruth Woodfield
Date Deposited: 02 Nov 2012 16:25
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2013 10:38
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/42054

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