Different nerve-gliding exercises induce different magnitudes of median nerve longitudinal excursion: an in vivo study using dynamic ultrasound imaging

Coppieters, Michel W, Hough, Alan D and Dilley, Andrew (2009) Different nerve-gliding exercises induce different magnitudes of median nerve longitudinal excursion: an in vivo study using dynamic ultrasound imaging. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 39 (3). pp. 164-171. ISSN 1938-1344

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

Controlled laboratory study using single-group, within-subject comparisons.

OBJECTIVES

To determine in an in vivo study whether different types of nerve-gliding exercises are associated with different amounts of longitudinal nerve excursion.

BACKGROUND

Different types of nerve-gliding exercises have been proposed. It is assumed that different exercises produce different amounts of excursion and strain in the peripheral nervous system. Although this has been confirmed in cadaveric experiments, in vivo studies are lacking.

METHODS

High-resolution ultrasound was used to measure longitudinal excursion of the median nerve in the upper arm during 6 different nerve-gliding exercises. Nerve mobilization techniques that involved the elbow and neck were evaluated in 15 asymptomatic volunteers (mean +/- SD age, 30 +/- 8 years). Nerve longitudinal excursion was calculated using a frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data.

RESULTS

Different exercises induced different amounts of longitudinal nerve excursion (P<.0001). The "sliding technique" was associated with the largest excursion (mean +/- SD, 10.2 +/- 2.8 mm; P = .0001). The amount of nerve movement associated with the "tensioning technique" (mean +/- SD, 1.8 +/- 4.0 mm) was smaller than the nerve excursion induced with individual movements of the neck or elbow (mean +/- SD range, -3.4 +/- 0.9 to 5.6 +/- 2.1 mm; P = .0001).

CONCLUSION

These findings confirm that different types of neurodynamic techniques have different mechanical effects on the nervous system. Recognition of these differences may assist in the selection of treatment techniques. Having demonstrated differences in mechanical effects, future research will have to evaluate whether these different techniques are also associated with different physiological and therapeutic effects.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: diagnostic ultrasound, nerve biomechanics, neurodynamic test, ultrasonography
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Division of Medical Education
Subjects: Q Science > QM Human anatomy
R Medicine
Depositing User: Patricia Butler
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2012 09:55
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2017 09:08
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/41775
📧 Request an update