Mood as input and perseverative worrying following the induction of discrete negative moods

Meeten, Fran and Davey, Graham (2012) Mood as input and perseverative worrying following the induction of discrete negative moods. Behavior Therapy, 43 (2). pp. 393-406. ISSN 1878-1888

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Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated that a combination of negative mood and rigorous “as many as can” stop rules can be used to help explain a range of perseverative psy- chopathologies such as pathological worrying, compulsive checking, and depressive rumination (known as the mood-as-input hypothesis). The aim of the present study was to extend this work and examine whether specific emo- tions of the same valence will have similar or differential effects on task perseveration. The study experimentally induced discrete moods and manipulated task stop rules in an analog population. Results showed that perseveration at a worry-based interview task conformed to standard mood-as-input predictions in which perseveration was sig- nificantly greater when an “as many as can” stop rule was paired with a negative mood or a “feel like continuing” stop rule was paired with a positively valenced mood. The pattern of results revealed no significant inherent differences in processing depending on the type of discrete negative mood being experienced. These findings support a view of mood-as-input effects where overall valency is the important factor in determining perseveration.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: Q Science > QZ Psychology
Depositing User: Graham Davey
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2012 14:16
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2012 14:16
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/41376
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