I know your face but not where I saw you: Context memory is impaired for other-race faces

Horry, Ruth and Wright, Daniel B (2008) I know your face but not where I saw you: Context memory is impaired for other-race faces. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 15 (3). pp. 610-614. ISSN 1069-9384

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Abstract

People are more likely to falsely identify a face of another race than a face of their own race. When witnesses
make identifications, they often need to remember where they have previously encountered a face. Failure to
remember the context of an encounter can result in unconscious transference and lead to misidentifications.
Forty-five White participants were shown White and Black faces, each presented on one of five backgrounds.
The participants had to identify these faces in an old/new recognition test. If participants stated that they had seen
a face, they had to identify the context in which the face had originally appeared. Participants made more context
errors with Black faces than with White faces. This shows that the own-race bias extends to context memory.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Ruth Horry
Date Deposited: 01 May 2012 11:05
Last Modified: 28 May 2012 14:36
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/37582
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