Neural noise induces the evolution of robust behaviour by avoiding non-functional bifurcations

Fernandez Leon, Jose and Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro (2008) Neural noise induces the evolution of robust behaviour by avoiding non-functional bifurcations. In: 10th International Conference on the Simulation of Adaptive Behavior, Japan.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Continuous-time recurrent neural networks affected by random additive noise are evolved to produce phototactic behaviour in simulated mobile agents. The resulting neurocontrollers are evaluated after evolution against perturbations and for different levels of neural noise. Controllers evolved with neural noise are more robust and may still function in the absence of noise. Evidence from behavioural tests indicates that robust controllers do not undergo noise-induced bifurcations or if they do, the transient dynamics remain functional. A general hypothesis is proposed according to which evolution implicitly selects neural systems that operate in noise-resistant landscapes which are hard to bifurcate and/or bifurcate while retaining functionality.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Schools and Departments: School of Engineering and Informatics > Informatics
Depositing User: Jose A. FernandezLeon
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2012 16:55
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2012 11:51
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/37049
📧 Request an update