Different phases of long-term associative memory require PKA activation in different time windows after a single learning trial

Michel, Maximilian, Kemenes, Ildikó, Müller, Uli and Kemenes, György (2008) Different phases of long-term associative memory require PKA activation in different time windows after a single learning trial. Learning & Memory, 15 (9). pp. 694-702. ISSN 1072-0502

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Abstract

The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is known to play a critical role in both transcription-independent short-term or intermediate-term memory and transcription-dependent long-term memory (LTM). Although distinct phases of LTM already have been demonstrated in some systems, it is not known whether these phases require distinct temporal patterns of learning-induced PKA activation. This question was addressed in a robust form of associative LTM that emerges within a matter of hours after single-trial food-reward classical conditioning in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. After establishing the molecular and functional identity of the PKA catalytic subunit in the Lymnaea nervous system, we used a combination of PKA activity measurement and inhibition techniques to investigate its role in LTM in intact animals. PKA activity in ganglia involved in single-trial learning showed a short latency but prolonged increase after classical conditioning. However, while increased PKA activity immediately after training (0¿10 min) was essential for an early phase of LTM (6 h), the late phase of LTM (24 h) required a prolonged increase in PKA activity. These observations indicate mechanistically different roles for PKA in recent and more remote phases of LTM, which may underpin different cellular and molecular mechanisms required for these phases.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
Subjects: Q Science
Depositing User: Maximilian Michel
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 21:24
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2013 14:32
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/31084
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