Innexins in the lobster stomatogastric nervous system: cloning, phylogenetic analysis, developmental changes and expression within adult identified dye and electrically coupled neurons

Ducret, E, Alexopoulos, H, Le Feuvre, Y, Davies, J A, Meyrand, P, Bacon, J P and Fénelon, V S (2006) Innexins in the lobster stomatogastric nervous system: cloning, phylogenetic analysis, developmental changes and expression within adult identified dye and electrically coupled neurons. European Journal of Neuroscience, 24 (11). pp. 3119-3133. ISSN 0953-816X

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Abstract

Gap junctions play a key role in the operation of neuronal networks by enabling direct electrical and metabolic communication between neurons. Suitable models to investigate their role in network operation and plasticity are invertebrate motor networks, which are built of comparatively few identified neurons, and can be examined throughout development; an excellent example is the lobster stomatogastric nervous system. In invertebrates, gap junctions are formed by proteins that belong to the innexin family. Here, we report the first molecular characterization of two crustacean innexins: the lobster Homarus gammarus innexin 1 (Hg-inx1) and 2 (Hg-inx2). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that innexin gene duplication occurred within the arthropod clade before the separation of insect and crustacean lineages. Using in situ hybridization, we find that each innexin is expressed within the adult and developing lobster stomatogastric nervous system and undergoes a marked down-regulation throughout development within the stomatogastric ganglion (STG).The number of innexin expressing neurons is significantly higher in the embryo than in the adult. By combining in situ hybridization, dye and electrical coupling experiments on identified neurons, we demonstrate that adult neurons that express at least one innexin are dye and electrically coupled with at least one other STG neuron. Finally, two STG neurons display no detectable amount of either innexin mRNAs but may express weak electrical coupling with other STG neurons, suggesting the existence of other forms of innexins. Altogether, we provide evidence that innexins are expressed within small neuronal networks built of dye and electrically coupled neurons and may be developmentally regulated. © The Authors (2006).

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Evolution, Behaviour and Environment
Depositing User: Jane Davies
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 21:10
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2012 14:38
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/29943
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