Pride and Prejudice: Legalizing Compulsory Heterosexuality in New York's Annual St. Patrick's Day Parades

Munt, Sally R and O'Donnell, Katherine (2007) Pride and Prejudice: Legalizing Compulsory Heterosexuality in New York's Annual St. Patrick's Day Parades. Space and Culture, 10 (1). pp. 94-114. ISSN 1206-3312

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Abstract

This article discusses the successful legal exclusion of Irish lesbians and gays from the St. Patrick's Day parade in New York and explores the ideologies of nation-space and public space that underpin this exclusion. It argues that the progression through urban space of the marches enforces compulsory heterosexuality, through actual and semiotic exclusion. Irish American nationalism can be read as illustrative of the heterosexualization of nationalism. It was the unquestioned assumption that being homosexual is antithetical to being Irish that provided the fundamental premise from which it was logically and successfully argued in U.S. courts: that the Irish Lesbian and Gay Organization is a violent, obscene enemy bent on the destruction of Irish ethnicity and Irish communities. By contrast, the article holds up the parades in Cork and Dublin as designated inclusive and multicultural events, the nation-space of the Irish Republic economically liberated and wishing to communicate modernity to its citizens.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Media, Film and Music > Media and Film
Depositing User: Sally Munt
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 21:05
Last Modified: 21 May 2012 13:01
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/29435
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