The Taj Mahal in the High Street: the Indian restaurant as diasporic popular culture in Britain

Highmore, Ben (2009) The Taj Mahal in the High Street: the Indian restaurant as diasporic popular culture in Britain. Food, Culture and Society, 12 (2). pp. 173-190. ISSN 1552-8014

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Abstract

This paper takes the British high street South Asian or "Indian" restaurant as an example of diasporic popular culture. It traces the historical emergence of the Indian restaurant as a popular form, through the early nineteenth-century to the present. Alongside the emergence of a thriving diasporic restaurant culture the paper also examines the way that South Asian food culture has been represented in recipe books and food guides. Arguing that popular culture is never pure, authentic or separable from an interlacing network of power and domination, the paper situates the Indian restaurant within a dynamic neocolonial culture. However, the Indian restaurant is also an agent in this culture, and thrives due to the ingenuity, resilience and tenacity of a diasporic community.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Media, Film and Music > Media and Film
Depositing User: Ben Highmore
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 21:01
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2012 14:56
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/29177
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