An Experimental Exploration of the relationship between Subjective Impressions of Illumination and Physical Fidelity

Mania, Katerina and Robinson, Andrew (2005) An Experimental Exploration of the relationship between Subjective Impressions of Illumination and Physical Fidelity. Computers & Graphics, 29 (1). pp. 49-56. ISSN 0097-8493

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Abstract

Two experiments were carried out to explore the effect of rendering and interface fidelity on subjective impressions of illumination and perceived presence after exposure to a virtual environment (VE). In particular, a study that compares a real-world task situation to its computer graphics simulation counterpart is presented. The computer graphics simulation was based on photometry data acquired in the real-world space and was displayed on either a Head Mounted Display or desktop display utilising either monocular or stereo imagery and interaction interfaces such as the common mouse and head tracking. 105 participants across five conditions were exposed to the real and computer graphics environment and after completing a spatial task, subjective impressions of the illumination and sense of presence assessments were acquired. Relevant results showed a positive correlation between presence and subjective impressions of lighting (e.g. warm,comfortable,spacious, etc.) for the HMD monocular conditions. For the second study, the computer graphics scenes were rendered in varied levels of shadow accuracy utilising flat-shaded and radiosity rendering and were displayed on a stereo, head tracked Head Mounted Display (HMD). A total of 36 participants across three visual conditions were exposed to the scene and after completing a spatial task, subjective impressions of the illumination and sense of presence assessments were acquired. Relevant results showed a positive correlation between presence and subjective impressions of lighting (e.g. warm,comfortable,spacious, etc.) associated to the high-quality, full-shadow accuracy rendering condition. There was no effect of viewing condition upon subjective impressions of illumination for both studies, because of constant luminance levels. How real-world impressions of illumination could be simulated in a synthetic scene is still an open research question.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Originality: This paper provides new empirical evidence examining the relationship between subjective impressions of illumination as studied in architecture and 'presence' while immersed in a 3D simulation of varied rendering fidelity. This work is highly interdisciplinary. Rigour: Statistical correlations are performed based on standardized measuring devices for presence (Likert scales) and subjective impressions of illumination (Likert scales on bipolar adjectives). Significance: This approach goes beyond physics-based rendering, examining subjective impressions of illumination (whether a lit space is perceived to be warm or cold, comfortable or uncomfortable, etc) which might not be induced necessarily by exact replication of the real-world illumination. Impact: This output was selected as one of a set of best papers presented at the ACM Siggraph conference on Virtual Reality Continuum and its Applications in Industry 2004 in Singapore and has been extended for publications in this journal.
Schools and Departments: School of Engineering and Informatics > Informatics
Depositing User: Aikaterini Mania
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 20:44
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2012 11:24
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/27866
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