‘Cometh the hour, cometh the Dave’: how far is the conservative party's revival all down to David Cameron?

Bale, Tim (2009) ‘Cometh the hour, cometh the Dave’: how far is the conservative party's revival all down to David Cameron? Political Quarterly, 80 (2). pp. 222-232. ISSN 0032-3179

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

While one can overstate the extent to which the Conservative party has changed since 2005, especially in the light of its response to the recession, the upturn in its electoral prospects is undeniable. Not surprisingly, the Conservative leader, David Cameron, is widely credited with turning around his party's fortunes. In fact, he started with several advantages over his predecessors: New Labour was well past its prime; the economy was running into trouble; and an increasingly desperate Conservative party was more willing to listen to the message that it needed to modernise and moderate. That said, Cameron has been crucial. His communication skills are unparalleled. Early success bought him time and ‘permission to be heard’. Most important though, has been his determination-despite media criticism-to stick with a staged strategy focused on conveying change and a move to the centre ground while at the same time reassuring and dividing the Tory right.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Politics
Subjects: J Political Science > JN Political institutions (Europe) > JN0101 Great Britain
Depositing User: Tim Bale
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 20:39
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2012 09:38
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/27269
📧 Request an update