A quiet revolution in Brighton: Dr Helen Boyle's pioneering approach to mental health care, 1899-1939

Westwood, Louise (2001) A quiet revolution in Brighton: Dr Helen Boyle's pioneering approach to mental health care, 1899-1939. Social History of Medicine, 14 (3). pp. 439-457. ISSN 0951-631X

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The History of the care and treatment of the 'insane' has concentrated largely on the public and private asylums. London-based facilities such as the Tavistock and the Maudsley have been given a great deal of attention because of wealthy benefactors and the involvement of high profile individuals. Boyle's unique in-patient facility in Brighton preceded the Maudsley by almost 20 years and such fills an important gap in mental health history. Boyle's work challenged the lunacy laws and set out to establish a holistic system of care for recoverable conditions outside the asylum system. This essay concentrates on the work of Dr Helen Boyle in Brighton but also highlights other facilities that were available for rate-aided patients, which have been neglected in the historiography of mental health care.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of History, Art History and Philosophy > History
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA History of Great Britain > DA020 England > DA670 Local history and description > DA690 Other cities, towns, etc., A-Z > DA690.B78 Brighton
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 20:34
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2012 08:20
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/26731
📧 Request an update