Effectiveness of means used for crop protection against wildlife: Implications for conservation and biodiversity management at Bardia National Park

Thapa Karki, Shova (2010) Effectiveness of means used for crop protection against wildlife: Implications for conservation and biodiversity management at Bardia National Park. Crop Protection, 29 (11). pp. 1297-1304. ISSN 02612194

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/

Abstract

Conflicts due to damage caused by wildlife pose serious threats to conservation. In addition, wildlife damage incurs severe economic loss to communities living in the close vicinity of the park, affecting the livelihoods and well-being of locals. While different studies have emphasised identification and quantification of crop damage problems, studies highlighting the means used for crop protection and their effectiveness are limited. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of means used by communities to protect their crops against wildlife. 117 households were visited at two Buffer Zone villages of Bardia National Park, Nepal. Findings suggested that crop depredation by wildlife was a function of several factors, such as the distance of the farmland from the park, the size of the crop raiding animals and the frequency of attacks on the farmland, and the type of crops. Ten different means were identified by communities which were used regularly to prevent crop damage. Households combined both traditional and modern means to guard their crop against the wild animals. Means differed according to the animals as well as crops being protected. Among all these means, Machan (i.e. watch towers) combined with other means such as throwing flaming sticks and group shouting were the most effective and safest modes of crop guarding for all kinds of animals and crops. Trench and Bio-fencing were effective mostly for deer species. However, crop guarding was an intensive process and no means were able to completely prevent crop damage. Problem animals differed according to the villages and crops being damaged, which suggests that employment of single means would be ineffective. Site-specific management strategies and economic as well as technical support from funding organisations would be most useful to minimise crop loss. In addition information exchange and learning between farmers and the park management about different mitigating means could support and prepare farmers for improvement in the means.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > Business and Management
Depositing User: Shova Thapa Karki
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 19:38
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2012 10:02
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/21547
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