The Impact of Proportional Representation on Government Effectiveness: The New Zealand Experience

Boston, Jonathan, Church, Stephen and Bale, Tim (2003) The Impact of Proportional Representation on Government Effectiveness: The New Zealand Experience. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 62 (4). pp. 7-22. ISSN 0313-6647

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Abstract

It is often claimed that proportional representation (PR) undermines government effectiveness, including decisional efficacy, fiscal prudence, electoral responsiveness and accountability. Drawing on New Zealand's experience since the introduction of a mixed-member proportional (MMP) electoral system in 1996, this article examines the impact of the new voting system on government effectiveness. Although government durability has been substantially reduced and the policy-making process has become more complex, governments under MMP appear to be no less able to address major policy problems or respond to changing economic circumstances. Moreover, New Zealand has maintained continuous fiscal surpluses under MMP — a radical departure from the protracted, and often large, deficits that characterised the previous two decades under a majoritarian electoral system.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Politics
Subjects: J Political Science > JQ Political institutions and public administration (Asia, Africa, Australia, Pacific Area, etc.) > JQ3995 Australia. New Zealand. Pacific Ocean islands
Depositing User: Tim Bale
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 19:28
Last Modified: 11 May 2012 09:46
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/20741
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