The other side of the nearly neutral theory, evidence for slightly advantageous back-mutations

Charlesworth, Jane and Eyre-Walker, Adam (2007) The other side of the nearly neutral theory, evidence for slightly advantageous back-mutations. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104 (43). pp. 16992-16997. ISSN 1091-6490

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

We argue that if there is a category of slightly deleterious mutations, then there should be a category of slightly advantageous back-mutations. We show that when there are both slightly deleterious and advantageous back-mutations, there is likely to be an increase in the rate of evolution after a population size expansion. This increase in the rate of evolution is short-lived. However, we show how its signature can be captured by comparing the rate of evolution in species that have undergone population size expansion versus contraction. We test our model by comparing the pattern of evolution in pairs of island and mainland species in which the colonization event was either island-to-mainland (population size expansion) or mainland-to-island (contraction). We show that the predicted pattern of evolution is observed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The first evidence that there is a category of slightly advantageous back-mutations. AEW designed the analysis, performed the theoretical investigation and wrote the paper; JC, who was a PHD student with AEW, collected and analysed the data.
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Evolution, Behaviour and Environment
Depositing User: Jane Charlesworth
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 19:11
Last Modified: 21 May 2012 15:46
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/19519
📧 Request an update