Selective expression of electrical correlates of differential appetitive classical conditioning in a feeding network.

Jones, Nick, Kemenes, György and Benjamin, Paul R (2001) Selective expression of electrical correlates of differential appetitive classical conditioning in a feeding network. Journal of Neurophysiology, 85 (1). pp. 89-97. ISSN 0022-3077

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Abstract

Electrical correlates of differential appetitive classical conditioning were recorded in the neural network that underlies feeding in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. In spaced training (15 trials over 3 days), the lips and the tentacle were used as CS+ (reinforced conditioned stimulus) or CS- (nonreinforced conditioned stimulus) sites for behavioral tactile conditioning. In one group of experimental animals, touch to the lips (the CS+ site) was followed by sucrose (the unconditioned stimulus, US), but touch to the tentacle (the CS- site) was not reinforced. In a second experimental group the CS+/CS- sites were reversed. Semi-intact lip-tentacle-CNS preparations were made from both experimental groups and a naive control group. Intracellular recordings were made from the B3 motor neuron of the feeding network, which allowed the monitoring of activity in the feeding central pattern generator (CPG) interneurons as well as early synaptic inputs evoked by the touch stimulus. Following successful behavioral conditioning, the touch stimulus evoked CPG-driven fictive feeding activity at the CS+ but not the CS- sites in both experimental groups. Naive snails/preparations showed no touch responses. A weak asymmetrical stimulus generalization of conditioned feeding was not retained at the electrophysiological level. An early excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) response to touch was only enhanced following conditioning in the Lip CS+/tentacle CS- group but not in the Tentacle CS+/lip CS- group. The results show that the main features of differential appetitive classical conditioning can be recorded at the electrophysiological level, but some characteristics of the conditioned response are selectively expressed in the reduced preparation.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
Depositing User: George Kemenes
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 19:03
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2012 12:39
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/19202
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