Atlantic slavery and traumatic representation in museums: the National Great Blacks in wax museum as a test case

Wood, Marcus (2008) Atlantic slavery and traumatic representation in museums: the National Great Blacks in wax museum as a test case. Slavery and Abolition, 29 (2). pp. 151-171. ISSN 0144-039X

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Abstract

This article uses the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, as a context for thinking about the success and failure of British institutional attempts to commemorate the traumatic memory of Atlantic slavery in 2007. The analysis opens with a contextualising history of the development and philosophy of Elmer and Joanne Martin, the co-founders of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum. Three special exhibits - namely, '100 Greatest Black Inventions', 'The Middle Passage' and 'Lynching' - are then considered in detail. The discussion makes extensive use of interviews conducted with artists and museum staff responsible for creating and displaying the exhibits.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of English > English
Depositing User: Marcus Wood
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 18:48
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2013 12:33
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/18451
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