Using worms to better understand how Bacillus thuringiensis kills insects

Crickmore, Neil (2005) Using worms to better understand how Bacillus thuringiensis kills insects. Trends in Microbiology, 13 (8). pp. 347-350. ISSN 0966-842X

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Abstract

Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biological pesticide to control insects that either cause damage to crops or transmit disease. That it can also target the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans has not only provided exciting new insights into how the toxins produced by the bacterium target their victims but also how target insects counter the attack. Modern approaches such as reverse genetics and microarray technology have revealed novel receptors for the toxins and possible signal transduction pathways induced within the host following intoxication. This article will discuss how these findings fit in with current models and how they might influence future studies.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Depositing User: Neil Crickmore
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 18:48
Last Modified: 16 Jul 2012 10:36
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/18420
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